News

 

Executive ST Rogers speaks out for union rights at Harvard. 

On February 28th a strong contingent of labor supporters joined the UFCW to protest the lack of progress in negotiations with Macy's department stores.

As the government shutdown drags on, some 7,800 federal workers across Massachusetts aren’t receiving a paycheck—even as many are forced to report for work.

We need to send a message on February 26th that no Supreme Court decision will stifle the voice of workers seeking dignity and respect on the job with a union. In addition we need to reaffirm that Boston is a ‘Union City’ and will always be a ‘Union City’.

GBLC's Future Committee held its annual Young Worker Conference on Saturday, December 2nd at 1199SEIU.

Young members from 14 unions/organizations were in attendance. Participants learned about the current challenges facing organized labor such as privatization, Right to Work legislation, there was a presentation by Enid Eckstein, formerly of 1199SEIU, on the upcoming Janus v. AFSCME Supreme Court Case.

On Friday November 17th the Montvale Plaza in Stoneham was the venue for the Greater Boston Labor Council’s 14th annual honors dinner. Approximately 250 union leaders, activists and allies were in attendance as the council recognized the contributions of three outstanding leaders; Stephanie Muccini Burke, the Mayor of Medford, Congressman Mike Capuano and Jeff Sullivan, the Business Manager of Painters District Council 35.

I’m thrilled to have such a strong team to work with in 2018 and beyond. We are fortunate to have experienced and effective officers in Lou and Darlene and a terrific executive-board that encompasses the wide range of unions that make Greater Boston a labor stronghold.

Rich Rogers, Executive Secretary-Treasurer

A four-year fight to expand overtime pay to millions of workers may soon be over. About 1.2 million workers will win and 2.8 million will lose.

The Department of Labor is scaling back an Obama-era rule that would have doubled the maximum salary for a worker to qualify for overtime pay, according to a proposed rule the agency sent to the Office of the Federal Register for public review.

In speeches and in press releases over the last year, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka has pointed out that unions are uniquely qualified by their very nature to lead the country out of what he has called a “dark period,” a time when hateful speech and vitriol emanate from the White House and are found in abundance everywhere else. Unions, he notes, bring together all kinds of people in a fight that is common to the vast majority, a fight for a better life for oneself and for the next generation.

On Feb. 15, just days after massive layoffs at Activision Blizzard, the AFL-CIO issued a powerful public statement of support to game developers in the United States. Its message, published in an open letter at Kotaku, was both simple and profound.

Black leaders, activists, and organizers formed the backbone of the U.S. labor movement. Even when the forces of structural racism and segregation sought to stifle their contributions, their resolve to fight for workers’ rights alongside the cause of civil rights remained unshakable. Black women, in particular, have played an enormous role in the movement’s legacy and development.