News

On Monday April 9th the OMNI Parker House Boston was the venue for the Greater Boston Labor Council’s annual legislative breakfast.

On  Monday February 26th the affiliated unions of the Greater Boston Labor Council demonstrated once again that union solidarity is alive and well in Boston.

As Hurricane Harvey and its remnants bring unprecedented flooding and damage to a huge portion of Texas, working people in the state are going above and beyond their duties to help one another.

In January, I was invited to serve on President Donald Trump’s manufacturing council, along with my boss, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. At the time, I was deputy chief of staff at the AFL-CIO (the largest federation of trade unions in America) and a spokesperson for the organization on trade, manufacturing, and economic policy. President Trumka and I agreed to serve because we believed — and still do — that working people should have a voice in crucial government decisions affecting their jobs, their lives, and their families.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump stood in the lobby of his tower on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan and again made excuses for bigotry and terrorism, effectively repudiating the remarks his staff wrote a day earlier in response to the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Va.
To the editors,

Sheet metal worker and 9/11 first responder Joe Rabito takes 14 medications a day so he can breathe. Joe was one of the tens of thousands of first responders in New York City who went out to help survivors of the World Trade Center attacks.

These people, many of them union members, are still feeling the physical and mental long-term health effects from the work they did as first responders. 

This is why the Zadroga Act, which provides permanent health care and compensation to 9/11 survivors and first responders, is so important. 

Based on exit poll data for the 2012 election, over 70% of African American women voted in the election, 65.6% of white women, 62.6% percent of white men and 61.4% of African American men voted in the same election. “The reason why Black women made the difference is because we bring our entire household to the polls with us” said Carmen Berkley, director of Civil, Human and Woman’s Rights, AFL-CIO. “An investment in Black women is an investment in a number of different people within a particular household.”
AFL-CIO president, Richard Trumka, published a new column on Huffington Post. He writes how Hillary roots for working people and why working people are championing her in tonight's presidential debate.

One night at his UPS job, Tefere Gebre's co-worker handed him some union material. 

“He told me that I’d get health care and vacation and other benefits by filling it out. I said, ‘Are you serious?’ I thought, ‘Hmm. Everyone should have that.’”

Tefere, the executive vice president of the AFL-CIO, has been a proud union member for most of his life, valuing the freedom of people to come together in union.