News

On Monday April 9th the OMNI Parker House Boston was the venue for the Greater Boston Labor Council’s annual legislative breakfast.

On  Monday February 26th the affiliated unions of the Greater Boston Labor Council demonstrated once again that union solidarity is alive and well in Boston.

Public transit should be a public good and by preventing the costly privatization of bus safety and maintenance operations, the mechanics have scored a major victory for workers, riders, and taxpayers. (click for full statement)

We need to send a message on February 26th that no Supreme Court decision will stifle the voice of workers seeking dignity and respect on the job with a union. In addition we need to reaffirm that Boston is a ‘Union City’ and will always be a ‘Union City’.

GBLC's Future Committee held its annual Young Worker Conference on Saturday, December 2nd at 1199SEIU.

Young members from 14 unions/organizations were in attendance. Participants learned about the current challenges facing organized labor such as privatization, Right to Work legislation, there was a presentation by Enid Eckstein, formerly of 1199SEIU, on the upcoming Janus v. AFSCME Supreme Court Case.

On Friday November 17th the Montvale Plaza in Stoneham was the venue for the Greater Boston Labor Council’s 14th annual honors dinner. Approximately 250 union leaders, activists and allies were in attendance as the council recognized the contributions of three outstanding leaders; Stephanie Muccini Burke, the Mayor of Medford, Congressman Mike Capuano and Jeff Sullivan, the Business Manager of Painters District Council 35.

I’m thrilled to have such a strong team to work with in 2018 and beyond. We are fortunate to have experienced and effective officers in Lou and Darlene and a terrific executive-board that encompasses the wide range of unions that make Greater Boston a labor stronghold.

Rich Rogers, Executive Secretary-Treasurer

Organized labor managed an increasingly rare feat on Monday — a political victory — when its allies turned back a Senate measure aimed at rolling back labor rights on tribal lands.

The legislation, called the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, would have exempted enterprises owned and operated by Native American tribes from federal labor standards, even for employees who were not tribal citizens.

The notion of bringing home 80 cents for every dollar pocketed by a man on a national basis is unsettling enough. But it's even more startling when those lost wages are added up.

Overall, it amounts to $10,000 in lost wages a year, says Debra Ness, president of the National Partnership for Women and Families. That chunk of cash could pay for 14 more months of child care, 74 more weeks of groceries and an additional 10 months of rent for the average woman.

Fifty years ago this week, Martin Luther King Jr. went to Memphis, Tennessee, to march with the city’s striking black sanitation workers. Wages were bad, and conditions were so unsafe that workers were seriously injured or even killed while using the trash compactors of their trucks. The city of Memphis, their employer, refused to do better; city officials refused to act to improve their wages or safety.