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AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka discusses why America needs a strong labor movement and how the Biden administration is committed to strengthening unions.

On Tuesday, November 17 from 5-6:30pm, join the Massachusetts Labor Movement as we celebrate our hard work during this historic election season.

When it comes to appreciating educators, please heed an old expression: Walk the walk, don’t just talk the talk. As the head of the 1.7 million-member American Federation of Teachers, I know first-hand that educators go into our profession because they want to make a difference in students’ lives. They need real investments in teaching and learning, like books, supplies, and smaller class sizes; a voice in what happens in their schools; and latitude in their classrooms so they can tailor their teaching to meet the needs of their students.

The Federal Election Commission on Thursday gave a woman candidate running for Congress the green light to use portions of her campaign funds to pay for child care.

Longtime labor activist and leader Maria Elena Durazo is a familiar and beloved name to hundreds of thousands of union members and working people. She is vice president for UNITE HERE International Union, which represents more than 270,000 hospitality workers in the U.S. and Canada. And for almost a decade, 2006-2015, she was the first woman elected secretary-treasurer of the powerful Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, representing the interests of more than 300 local unions.

Saying workers are buffeted by automation, globalization and robotics, which threaten high joblessness, and firms robbing them of bargaining power to fight back and get jobs in the looming new economy, the AFL-CIO launched a year-long study of the state of work and the state of U.S. unions.

Replying to a mandate from last year’s AFL-CIO convention, the new Commission on the Future of Work and Unions met at federation headquarters on May 3, first in a 3-hour morning public session, and then behind closed doors for the rest of the day.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership died because it ultimately failed America’s working families. Instead of addressing the economic devastation wreaked by wrong-headed trade deals, the TPP doubled down on a failed, corporate-driven ideology.

On April 26, 2018  the GBLC joined the Metro Boston Building Trades Council, several of our affiliates, and community partners as the "Somervile Stands Together" Coalition in a march to Somerville City Hall to demand that the elected officials representing Somerville take a stand for a city that works for everyone.

The Somerville Stands Together Coalition demands that  elected officials to stand for workplace standards and conditions that are good for all workers.  That means the following:

Greater Boston Labor Council, Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative,MassCOSH, Community Labor United, MA Jobs with Justice & Massachusetts AFL-CIO

On Friday, April 27th, 2018  the Greater Boston Labor Council, along with the Massachusetts Coalition of Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH), Community Labor United, MA Jobs with Justice, Immigrant Workers Center Collabrative and the Massachusetts AFL-CIO held our annual commemoration of Workers Memorial Day on the steps of the Massachusetts State House. 

As walkouts by teachers protesting low pay and education funding shortfalls spread across the country, the small but growing movement to recruit teachers from overseas is another sign of the difficulty some districts are having providing the basics to public school students.