News

On Tuesday, November 17 from 5-6:30pm, join the Massachusetts Labor Movement as we celebrate our hard work during this historic election season.

Please donate this Saturday at our union member to member food drive to help some of the hardest hit in our union family.

In March, working families across the country started to scramble. Our homes were transformed into makeshift classrooms, summer camps and daycare centers as the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered schools and child care facilities.

In May, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the HEROES Act, a piece of legislation that would provide much-needed solutions to our current economic and public safety crisis. Unfortunately, its path forward has been uncertain. There has been no debate on the bill in the Senate, and Mitch McConnell even sent the Senate on vacation without hearing it.

Boston's labor unions call on lawmakers to pass four racial justice bills this session. We will fulfill our duty to fight for the new world that we know is possible. By passing legislation championed by labor's movement partners to support housing justice, evironmental justice, immigration justice and justice for families, Massachusetts can take a step towards racial justice for working class familie and our communities. 

Join the GBLC and United Way of Massachusetts Bay on Saturday, July 18th 9-noon at the Stockyard in Brighton. This food drive is benefitting the Brazilian Workers Center's distribution effort.
Please bring shelf-stable food items to donate. 

More than three years after taking office, the administration has never filled the job running the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which is charged with enforcing workplace safety laws. The $560 million-a-year agency, whose estimated 2,000 inspectors performed 32,020 on-site inspections in 2018, spent months not doing any in-person inspections related to coronavirus, other than in hospitals, said Rebecca Reindel, director of occupational safety and health for the AFL-CIO.

Working people are bearing the brunt of this global pandemic and economic crisis. The physical toll, death, pain, and suffering that Oregon’s frontline and essential workers have experienced is unprecedented.

Coupled with the economic collapse that has exacerbated long-term inequities for low wage workers and BIPOC communities, workers are hurting and they need protections.

Daniel DiSalvo asks: “Will Unions Let Schools Reopen?” (op-ed, June 30). Of course! The AFT published our school reopening plan in April. We said it isn’t a question of whether to reopen, but how to do it safely. We need the infrastructure and investment to physically distance, stagger classes, provide personal protective equipment and test, trace and isolate new cases.